Archives: ios

How Can I Use WebSocket on iOS?

If you’re a mobile developer, there’s a pretty good chance that you’ve used some kind of networking. Apps most often use a REST API, and usually it’s enough, as it allows fast and easy JSON based communication (here is a JSON object converter). One of the downsides is, however, that REST communication requires the client to […]

Dynamic Constraint Calculator for iOS

In today’s world of iOS development, graphical interface editors, especially Storyboards, gain more and more popularity. It’s because they continously improve, are easy to grasp, and provide a lot of features to make our lives easier. Not to mention, they save us from a ton of coding. One of these key features is Auto Layout, […]

Converting Your Project to Swift 3.0

Swift 3 is the first update since Apple announced Swift would be going open-source, and is packed with new features based on community direction. When converting to Swift 3, you’ll notice that practically every file needs changes! That’s largely because, all the Cocoa API names have changed. Or to be more precise, the API is […]

A Beginner’s Guide to XML Parsing in Swift

Tons of document formats using XML syntax had been developed, like RSS, Atom, SOAP and XHTML, so it’s good to know, how to work with them. If you are not familiar with XML, it’s basically a precisely formatted text or string, which can be parsed into an array of objects containing the precious information.

Everything You Need to Know About JSONJoy, SwiftyJSON & OCMapper

About JSON in general

In today’s world, most of the mobile and web applications we write include some background activity with an API, like handling user info, or fetching data. Over 90% of the time (I didn’t look up the exact number, I’m sure you will forgive me) the servers respond with a JSON object containing the information we desire. If you’re unfamiliar with the structure of a JSON object, it’s definitely worth looking into. There are quite a few greatly designed tutorials on the topic, there’s one on W3Schools, for example.

Once we receive the API response, we generally want to pass this information to our business logic, and eventually to our viewcontrollers.

The most straightforward way would be to deserialize this string (it is essentially nothing more than textual data) into a valid JSON object. These objects are usually a hierarchy of dictionaries and arrays. However, accessing these values from the root object is a pain in the rear. It’s time-consuming, produces messy code, and it’s unsafe. A typo in our code while accessing a key will not produce any errors, since the keys are strings. Without the keen eyes of an experienced developer, who can spot a typo from a mile off, debugging these coding errors takes a lot longer than it should.